ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Beautiful just to read, but incredibly useful if you write Japanese poetry such as haiku. 
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Evidently there's a terrible-sounding book on this topic, and someone decided to rant about that, with a very bad habit of equating nonviolent communication (the concept) with Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life by Marshall B. Rosenberg (the book).

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an article about a language created by and for women's perspective. I knew Suzette; she was one of my first famous writer-friends. I wrote college papers about her work. We actually connected when I mentioned that I was doing one on women's invented languages. She handed me her then-unpublished manuscript for a sequel to Native Tongue so I could copy precise quotes from it.

I'm one of the people who has kept that language alive and in use. I'm not fluent -- few people are -- but I own the dictionary/grammar and I taught a class on it in the Grey School of Wizardry. That included me adding a few suggested augmentations to make the language more useful to spellcasting, because if you look at the grammar, you can see how well it lends itself to certain locking and unlocking features.

I also use certain words whenever I need them. Radíidin  is certainly one of them, but so is ranem (nonpearl: an ugly thing such as a festering hatred to which one pays attention).  I use the emotion grids to explain why people feel the way they do, based on reason, blame, and futility; or the quality of reason behind it.  

There is so much in this language that speaks to things that people are just now beginning to discuss in public, in large numbers, rather than a handful of us canaries saying, "Hey, y'all, might could be you'd want to pay attention to this fire over here before it spreads."  Not just vocabulary, but grammar.  Grace and efficiency and power.

In a word, super-gizomology, and Suzette would dislike me saying that because she was a very unassuming person who avoided being made much of.  Sorry, old friend, I call 'em like I see 'em.  Like Nikola Tesla, you built something ahead of its time, and it's going to take a while for the rest of the world to figure out how it even turns on.  But linguistic super-gizmology it is, because it's full of fresh encodings, and those are rare as hen's teeth.  <3
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 Here's an article about the non-STEM gifted kids.

That was me, by the way.  I do like science, but I suck at math.  My off-the-charts (I mean that literally, I broke the Pimsleur) gift is linguistic.  I'm also high on existential intelligence, which started upsetting people when I was a toddler.  And naturalistic intelligence -- hence my scientific interests in plants, animals, outer space, etc.  

The vast majority of what people recognize as "gifted" falls into ONE intelligence, logical-mathematical, with a little spillover into visual-spatial for people who like to build stuff.

Folks can appreciate things like music or dance, but rarely think of the top performers as "gifted."  They're perfectly happy to take advantage of the kinesthetic genius who plays a popular sport, because that's of use and interest to the public.  If what you have is fine manual dexterity, they won't give a flying fuck.  Interpersonal experts who are leaders are praised; those who are brilliant followers are treated like kleenex.  And existential or intrapersonal genius just gets you in trouble.  Nowadays they'll probably just beat you to death.  I had a hard enough time when I was little and there was a lot more breathing room then.

So look at the field.  There are (at least) 9 types of intelligence.  Only one is widely recognized and supported, with fragments of others. That means between 7/9 and 8/9 gets ignored or actively attacked.  But there are gifted people in ALL of those areas.

If you know a gifted child, or for that matter adult, support them in their area of expertise.  And it's only going to be the obvious one about 1/9 of the time.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)


Day 3

In your own space, share a favorite piece of original canon (a TV episode, a song, a favorite interview, a book, a scene from a movie, etc) and explain why you love it so much. Leave a comment in this post saying you did it. Include a link to your post if you feel comfortable doing so
.

Among my favorites is the episode "Darmok" from Star Trek: The Next Generation.  It presents an alien race whose language is untranslatable because they speak in metaphor and allusion.  Within seconds I was yelling possible translations at the screen.  Some of these turned out to be accurate.  I'm pretty good at picking up languages on the fly, and I love xenolinguistics.  Other people have subsequently explored Tamarian grammar and vocabulary.  

I love this episode because it's one of the few that truly conveys a species that "thinks as well as a human, but not like  a human."  It leaves us with questions, not answers; puzzles, not solutions; and yet at the end of the episode ... Picard and Dathon at El-Adrel.

If you haven't seen it, watch it.  This episode works pretty well even out of context, and it's one of the greatest pieces of science fiction ever made.

Taphonomy

Dec. 11th, 2018 02:53 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
I found a fun new word today:

Taphonomy is the study of how organisms decay and become fossilized. The term taphonomy (from the Greek taphos, τάφος meaning "burial", and nomos, νόμος meaning "law") was introduced to paleontology in 1949[1] by Russian scientist Ivan Efremov to describe the study of the transition of remains, parts, or products of organisms from the biosphere to the lithosphere.
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem is spillover from the July 3, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] mama_kestrel, [personal profile] sweet_sparrow, and R.R. It also fills the "party" square in my 7-1-18 card for the Winterfest in July fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] mama_kestrel. It belongs to the Mercedes thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted "Uncanny Beginnings."  Shaun goes to day care for the first time.  I love this one because it introduces color dominoes that use the Feelipa symbols.  By incorporating those into games, not only is it inclusive, it enables everyone to learn the system.  So if a person loses their color vision, or all of it, the impact is slightly less because they already know some adaptive resources to compensate.  As shown, games like this work great in any language learning context because they encourage people to use vocabulary like "red," "square," "play," "next to," and so on.   
ysabetwordsmith: (Fly Free)
This is the freebie for the November [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] alexseanchai. It also fills the "liminal time" square in my 9-30-18 card for the Fall Bingo fest.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem is spillover from the July 3, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] pantha, [personal profile] gingicat, [personal profile] sweet_sparrow, [personal profile] siliconshaman, [personal profile] bairnsidhe, [personal profile] antisocialite_forum, and [personal profile] chanter_greenie. It also fills the "volunteer" square in my 7-1-18 card for the Winterfest Bingo. This poem has been sponsored by the pool run by [personal profile] ng_moonmoth. It belongs to the Iron Horses thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 [personal profile] silveradept shared several great language links here.  I'm amused that the language immersion techniques bear some resemblance to things I've shown my characters doing -- basically, grab some new words and put them into a practical context.  Talk about what you're doing as you do it.
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This is the free epic for the August 7, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl. It is spillover from the July 3, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] curiosity. This poem fills the "generosity" square in my 7-1-18 card for the Winter Fest in July Bingo. It belongs to the Aquariana thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This is the free epic for the July 3, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl reaching its $200 goal, chosen in an audience poll.  It came out of the July 3, 2018 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] zianuray. This poem also fills the "peace" square in my 7-1-18 card for the Winterfest in July Bingo. It belongs to the Mercedes thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
While working on something totally different, the pinball machine that is my brain offered up this random linguistic observation on how to distinguish jokes from attacks.

When everyone agrees that a remark was a joke, the teller and the listener laugh together.  When everyone agrees that a remark was an attack, then the teller is gratified, the listener is hurt or angry, and they're quite likely to quarrel.  The actions and perceptions are all congruent.

When the listener perceives an attack, however, it is the teller's response that makes the distinction.  A teller who meant to share a joke, but picked the wrong one and upset their listener, will validate the listener's perception and backpedal.  "Sorry, dude, I didn't realize that was a touchy topic and not funny for you.  Next time I'll tell a different kind of joke."  A teller who meant to attack will instead attempt to discredit  the listener's perception and obscure the attack.  "What's the matter with you, can't take a joke?"  The actions and perceptions are muddled.

The first case, a misplaced joke, is relatively straightforward to solve even if it is awkward and embarrassing.  Everyone who tells jokes will occasionally misplace one, just because humor is quirky, people have sore spots that aren't obvious, and social context is always changing.  You mop up the mess and move on.  Sometimes hidden under this area is the less socially graceful version of not apologizing but also not telling that kind of joke to that person again.

The second case is where it gets complicated and interesting.  The attacker attempts to avoid recriminations by downplaying the attack.  This can also happen if the remark was nasty but the teller didn't realize it, and after being alerted to the fact, also tries to evade responsibility instead of fixing it.  But the distinction is easily made between jokes and attacks: a teller will apologize for a joke but defend an attack.  Because the joke missed the goal, but the attack hit the goal, the teller's objective is different in those two cases.  Therefore, the action of dismissing it as a joke disproves the attacker's own argument.  Confirmation is found in the fact that many verbal attackers, having identified an effective attack, will use it repeatedly and aim to keep it just inside the bounds of what they can get away with, like serving a ball to bounce just inside the foul line.

This observation is useful in truncating the often-lengthy argument over what "is" or "is not" a joke.  "If you meant it as a joke, when the listener didn't laugh, you would have apologized.  Since you're not doing that, laughter was not the goal and your remark was not a joke."  That's compelling because everyone knows that the social goal of a joke is laughter.  If the teller claims that other people laughing makes it a joke, point out that if everyone but the target is laughing, that's not a joke, that's bullying.

When an argument is about the "isness" of things, proofs based on the generally known features of the thing -- rather than on personal interpretations -- can be very effective.

ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
So much fun.  :D 

I am reminded of the Cheela invention of counting, which uses a very similar method but ends up in base 12 instead of base 6.

Profile

ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
ysabetwordsmith

February 2019

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 1516
17181920212223
2425262728  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags