ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
... here are some things to try.

Most of this advice is good. It can be boiled down to, if you feel awful, try changing one simple thing.

I will add, don't pressure yourself too much about anything. Also check to see if these things make you feel better or accomplish a practical purpose. If so, keep doing them. If not, quit and try something else. Don't try to force yourself to look or act "normal" if it doesn't help or actually makes you feel worse. You've got better things to do with that spoon.

Beyond that ...

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
This poem is spillover from the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] rix_scaedu. It also fills the "drama" square in my 3-16-15 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the series Frankenstein's Family, and is a direct sequel to "Man's True Nature" and "Between Power and Vulnerability" so read those first.

Warning: While this poem does not have the gore of the first one, it is much heavier on social and legal tensions. If those are touchy issues for you, please consider your headspace before clicking through.

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
This poem is spillover from the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] rix_scaedu. It also fills the "disability (temporary)" square in my 5-22-14 card for the [community profile] origfic_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the series Frankenstein's Family, and is a direct sequel to "Man's True Nature" so you should read that one first.

Warning: This poem is nowhere near as gory as the first of the triptych. However, it delves deeper into the emotional and psychological issues. If the latter are more sensitive for you, consider your headspace before clicking through.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an essay about hidden disabilities in speculative fiction and real life. It makes some interesting points about people's assumptions and different levels of ability.

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
This poem is spillover from the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] rix_scaedu. It also fills the "trapped!" square in my 12-15-14 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles, LJ user Zianuray, and EdorFaus. It belongs to the series Frankenstein's Family. This is the first of three connected poems.

WARNING: This poem is intense and graphic hurt/comfort. The detailed warnings contain spoilers; highlight to read. Fridrik steps in an abandoned trap and suffers serious injuries. He is sometimes in human form, sometimes in wolf form, so be aware of the switch if animal injuries are squicky for you. He feels betrayed, even though that's not exactly what happened. Victor is pissed that somebody broke the rule forbidding traps, after he specifically designed the rules to prevent accidents like this, and consequently having trouble controlling his temper. Lots of gross medical details, quasi-historic treatment methods, a miserable flashbacking injured werewolf, desperately worried friends and family trying to help, awkward social dynamics, dominance issues, trouble thinking clearly under stress, trust issues, difficulty accepting urgently needed help, vampire bites, werewolf licking, and other mayhem. Also a bunch of the supporting links are graphic too. On the bright side, Fridrik will eventually recover, the teamwork is terrific, and this installment ends with two cuddlepiles. The mood is pretty typical of the "gothic fluff" in this series; it just has a higher amount of gore due to someone else's stupidity. Consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
The Frankenstein's Family story "Urgent Business"  by [personal profile] dialecticdreamer is now complete.  Begin with Part 1 if you've been waiting for the whole thing, or finish with Part 6 if you've been reading along.  The merchant Vladimir comes to the village with important messages, and finds more than he expected.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an article about (mostly problematic) representations of Native Americans in speculative fiction. Well, yeah, that's what you get if you read only or mostly wasicu history books. If you grow up on Naya Nuki and Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee ...

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ysabetwordsmith: (Karavai)
This is the freebie for the March Muse Fusion, prompted by LJ user wyld_dandelyon. It also fills the "Let them eat Pi(e)" square in my 3-2-15 card for the Pi(e) Bingo Fest.

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ysabetwordsmith: (Karavai)
The March Muse Fusion is open Friday 20-Sunday 22.  Come give us prompts or claim things for your own inspiration.  You don't necessarily have to be a Torn World member to play, although it does help.


From My Prompts

"Ring Leech" sketch by [personal profile] ellenmillion, who hopes to ink it in time for Sea Monster Month in May.

Portrait of Tosh by [personal profile] ellenmillion 


What I Have Written

"Beach Pies" -- today's freebie

"Unsolid Ground"
An earthquake prompt inspired the free-verse poem "Unsolid Ground." Dorom and several children witness an earthquake while fishing from the beach.
82 lines, Buy It Now = $41
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an article speculating on potential harm from wearable devices.  Let's consider some possible issues ...


1) Does it emit radiation? If so, it's probably something you don't want next to your skin a lot.  Remember that the most common danger from radiation isn't a single big does, but the buildup over time, in which a lot of tiny doses definitely add up.  This could be greatly reduced by shielding. Companies probably won't bother unless consumers force  them to. But you can probably make your own.  Radiation from wearables isn't very strong so you don't need six feet of concrete to stop it.  Consider also that some wearables emit a lot more than others.  Don't choose a high-rad device if a low-rad one will do what you need.

2) Does it contain toxic materials? This is common, as things must be proven unsafe rather than proven safe. There are things which, again, you probably don't want to press on your skin all the time. This is easily solved by using a protective cover of something you're not allergic to and don't make go haywire.  Don't trust corporations to put your safety first; they are legally obligated (in America) to put their shareholders' profits first.  Don't trust government agencies either; they're interested in avoiding panic and making their donors happy.  You are not their priority either.  Look for reports by people who don't have a dog in the fight.  These are rare, but tend to be more reliable if you can find them.  Also if something is getting banned somewhere, it's probably not great for your body.

3) Does it interfere with your somatic motions, make your body part hurt, or cause some other physical problems? This is likely an ergonomic issue which may be affected by the size, shape, weight, etc. of the device. Later generations will probably improve. If you have this problem, try moving the device, carrying it in a pocket, etc. If all else fails, wait a year or two and test a newer model.

4) Does it mess with your social, sleep, or other life patterns? This tends to be a behavior issue, which is a combination of physical and nonphysical factors. Staring at a glowing screen at night can make you unsleepy (but not untired, alas). So can thinking about complex things  such as what someone's latest message means for your schedule tomorrow. If you have this type of problem, try modifying the times when you use your device. Staring at the gizmo on your wrist could cause your to walk into traffic and get hit by a car, or piss off your friend and get dumped. If you are having this type of problem, try changing the way in which you interact with your device and with people around you.

5) In any case, pay close attention to new technology before and after adopting it.  What are the financial, physical, social, and time costs?  What are you gaining by using this tool?  What are you losing?  I highly recommend the Amish rule: When deciding whether to adopt a new piece of technology, ask whether it does more good than harm.  If it does more good, adopt it.  If it does more harm, do not adopt it.  (You don't have the draw the line in the same place they do.  I don't, but I use the same rule.  Heck, even they argue over it.)  Really really think about this.  Don't grab something new just because it is new and everyone says it's cool.  Think about what it will do for you  and what you'll have to give up to get that.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here is an illustrated discussion about racism in comics. First, it's an example of the peskiness that people of color deal with all the time. Second, it's a sharp reminder to build clear character sheets if you are working on a team, and what can go wrong if you're careless about that or change things over time. Whitewashing tends to annoy people a lot.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
LJ user Ng_moonmoth has written two pieces of demifiction based on my poem "Too Much Energy."  They do come with warnings, but if you read the source poem which inspired them, you'll probably be okay.

"News Bulletin: The Massacre of Cascabel" -- This gives an early glimpse of Carinan reactions to a major event in the war, which involved Spalling.  

"The Conscience of the War" -- Here is the beginning of the turnaround, poignantly portrayed in a war poem.


ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This was the linkback perk poem for the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It came out of the February 2015 Creative Jam. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] dialecticdreamer. It also fills the "animal transformation" square in my 1-3-15 card for the [community profile] trope_bingo fest. 8 of 17 verses have been posted.

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted Part 1 of her story "Urgent Business" in Frankenstein's Family.  It introduces a merchant, Vladimir, with some important messages for the village.  This takes place in December, overlapping with "Measure the Abundance" in the runup to Christmas, and laying some groundwork for the triptych.  "Urgent Business" will post daily until complete (skipping Saturday, which is "Salvaging" day) and there are six parts.

Regarding the triptych, "Man's True Nature" has been opened for microfunding at the sale price of $.25/line.  I haven't started posting yet, so the tally appears on the sale page under that poem's entry.  You can donate more toward it if you wish.  Once "Urgent Business" is fully posted, I will start posting "Man's True Nature."
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 Know the difference.  Also understand that meltdowns are not exclusive to neurovariant children.  Neurotypical kids and adults can have them too.  Everyone has a threshold where their brain will enter buffer overflow and cease to function properly due to excessive input.  It's just a lower threshold for some people than others.  Also understand how to cope with a meltdown.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an interesting article about face shapes in Disney.  Of those samples, it's clear that males have more diversity than females, but females have more diversity than is being recognized.

Joy and Elsa have a heart-shaped face: wider at the top, with a pointed chin, and a point of hair that sticks down in the center of the forehead.  Disgust and Merida have round faces.  Sadness has a pear shape, wider at the bottom than at the top, pretty rare.  Vanellope has a square face, look how flat it is on the bottom.

If you are an artist or a writer, you can avoid the cookie cutter effect by thinking about infrastructure.  One way to do this is to use reference photos.  I've been working my way through a splendid lineup of Olympic athletes.  When writing outside your own race/culture, using a sample photo -- especially of someone who seems "like" your character in some ways -- can help create a look that is well put-together and makes sense.  Another option is to make model sheets, like these from classic Elfquest.  This is ideal if you're creating a batch of characters all together, like the members of a team: you want them to contrast so they're easy to tell apart.  When designing a character, you may consult charts of body shape (male and female), face shape, eyes, earsnoses and lips.  Understand that certain features appear more or less often based on ethnic group, but populations have mingled a lot, so don't be afraid to mix and match.  Also for nonbinary sex/gender identity, either minimize strong sexual clues (very long or very short hair, pronounced angular or curved lines) or combine ones from both polarities.
ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
This poem was written outside the regular prompt calls. It was inspired partly by discussion with [personal profile] dialecticdreamer and also fills the "beautiful" square in my 3-16-15 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] dialecticdreamer. This poem belongs to the series Frankenstein's Family.

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
This poem came out of the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] technoshaman. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles.

Warning: This poem contains minor angst that may not be to everyone's taste. The warnings contain spoilers; highlight to read. While Fruszina and Adam are playing, she accidentally pushes him too hard and he falls off the porch. Emotional tension, minor childhood injury, a little bit of messy medical detail, and some yelling happen before people settle down. No hard feelings in the end, though. Consider your interests before reading onward.

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ysabetwordsmith: Victor Frankenstein in his fancy clothes (Frankenstein)
This poem is spillover from the February 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] redsixwing and[personal profile] dialecticdreamer. It also fills the "bites" square in my 11-25-14 card for the [community profile] hc_bingo fest, and the "sharing a bed" square in my 1-3-15 card for the [community profile] trope_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] technoshaman. It belongs to the series Frankenstein's Family.  It is a sequel to "Echoes of Another" and "Who Finds a True Friend" so is best read after those two.

Note: This poem features some things that might not be to everyone's taste. Highlight for details, some of which are spoilers. It features burgeoning empathic sensitivity, a married couple with an intimate friend, some awkward emotional tension on account of Dénes being demisexual and thus uncomfortable at high speed, sensual activity with quasi-erotic aspects, consensual biting, climax, MFF cuddling (with Dorottya between Csilla and Dénes if that matters), and other zingy stuff. Consider your preferences before reading onward.

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