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 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted the story "Hidden Complication."  World Worker finds out about Halley's mistake and goes to clean up the mess.
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted "A Tide of Grief and Melancholy" which deals with Steel having a nightmare.  Heavy reading, but it's fascinating stuff, and it has sparked some good conversations about safety vs. consent during an emergency. 
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
I was fascinating to find this quote that referenced emotional labor among the trials of women and men:

nature has decreed that for what men suffer by having to shave, be killed in battle, and eat the legs of chickens, women make amends by housekeeping, childbirth, and writing all the letters for both of them ...
-- Jan Struther
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 Alex Conall has posted the poem "Tolerance" which examines different meanings of the word and how they overlap.  It's a brilliant explanation of why tolerance has limits.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This is a favorite type of prairie grass.  I have little bluestem and big bluestem, a few bunches, in my prairie garden.  What I did not know it that this is a larval host plant for skipper butterflies.  We have lots of skippers, especially in the prairie garden. If their caterpillars are grass eaters, I guess now I know why.  :D
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 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer is hosting Magpie Monday today with a theme of "cottoncandy fluff."  Leave prompts, get ficlets.  Extend your wordcount by boosting the signal, donating (everything goes toward medical expenses), or if you're a new prompter.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Occupational therapy is one of the very few branches of health care that I have frequently seen putting out fantastic material. Here is an example of things occupational therapists have thought of for conserving energy in self-care.  The whole point to this field is enabling people to do things, by finding new ways to do stuff when the old way doesn't work anymore.
ysabetwordsmith: (gold star)
It's not shaped quite like anything from Earth, and it is crazy agile. Robot cheetah, bite my shiny metal ass!
ysabetwordsmith: (gold star)
In a little breath of Terramagne, I bring you a L-Amsterdam gizmologist who makes adaptive wind instruments.  

Why is this gizmology instead of just advanced tech?  Because he's customizing these things to whatever hand(s) his customers have. Some of the instruments have completely rebuilt the controls, moved toneholes, and made other major changes.  Others just have simple extensions, minor changes of key shape, etc.  The first really brilliant premise is to fit the instrument to the player, not the player to the instrument.  For example, many of these have props or supports.  Why is this not standard practice?  That's a stick with a clip on one end.  But people are routinely told they can't play an instrument if they can't hold it -- that happened to me with flute.  (I wanted to play piccolo.  They wouldn't let me, said I was only allowed to learn on flute.  I couldn't hold up a flute, so that didn't happen.)  A simple prop would have solved that problem, although not my lack of musical aptitude in this life.  The other brilliance is that the guy just sits down and figures out how to redesign each instrument as needed.  That kind of innovation is gizmology.  

On retro-engineering: once the design exists, another instrument maker of sufficient skill could duplicate it.  (The two adaptive necks, which can fit on an ordinary flute, could be mass-produced if anyone were arsed to do so.)  But most of them could NOT make an adaptive instrument for a different disability, let alone a constant stream of them for all different shapes.

This sort of thing is more common in Terramagne.  The one-handed nurse that Ragno winds up getting advice from is a flute player, and that gets Ragno interested.  It's a chance to learn something new, interesting, and fun -- rather than struggling to relearn yet another formerly easy task.
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[personal profile] siliconshaman is taking prompts on the theme of "The Resistance." Pricing for sponsorship is £1 per 500 words. Signal boosting earns you a free 500 words.  \o/
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] callibr8 tipped me to an article and a video about figure skating that are just gorgeous.  This reminded us both about Terramagne.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted the next story, "Planning Connections."  Robert Cort sets out to find some local support for the Finn family.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
The Harp Twins are crowdfunding new harps. (Remember, they need two of everything. Yikes.) At the concert we saw, they had acoustic pedal harps, and electic lever harps. Now they're saving for electroacoustic pedal harps, which will have special effects pedals along with the usual ones for changing the pitch. Pay close attention to the status: $13,615 of $6,000 goal.  $6000 was the amount they were short of the downpayment for having the harps made, after saving money on their own.  The overage all goes toward the monthly payments, which are also large.  So the more, the merrier.  If you've got a few bucks to spare, chip in and let there be more harping!

I have to say, my farmemory makes this all the more squeeworthy.  Concert harps were exciting enough -- the classic harps could only be repitched with a tuning key.  Special effects pedals?  My historic and futuristic aspects are both geeking out at the same time, and that almost never happens.  :D
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[personal profile] gingicat tipped me to this online resource for Jewish teaching and special needs.  In addition to helping Jewish families with special needs, this is also useful for anyone who has Jewish friends.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
The February Creative Jam is open on Dreamwidth and on LiveJournal. This month's theme is "Love."


From My Prompts



What I Have Written

Your second prompt inspired the free-verse poem "A Bicycle Built for Three." Cassandra gets a lesson in communication from her friends who have a Triplet bicycle.
109 lines, Buy It Now = $55

This inspired the free-verse poem "So Glad That You're Here." Turq and some kids enjoy a playground. So. Much. Fluff!
60 lines, Buy It Now = $20

"Marjorie's Baby" is a song sung by Amergin, from Polychrome Heroics, about a newborn bard.
36 lines, Buy It Now = $15

This session's freebie is "Star-crossed, Sun-swept."

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