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 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted the story "Building Storm."  It's one of two leading up to something I've sponsored, which will be appearing presently.  In this installment, Eax helps Bil deal with feelings of helplessness, confusing, and uselessness due to assorted disabilities left from Bil's earlier injuries.  It's a wonderful piece of hurt/comfort with excellent sociological aspects too.  <3   This is what science fiction should be.
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[personal profile] shiori_makiba has posted two new entries in the Berettaflies thread.

"Playing Games" focuses on Tsubasa and Ashley, when they are playing cards (with ultraviolet ink) and realize that everyone but Ashley can see the markings.

"A Pretty Good Friend" gives Tsubasa's perspective on inclusion and friendship.  Aww.
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[personal profile] siliconshaman has posted the story "Marked Cards."  Ashley's teammates are playing with UV-printed cards, which she can't read.  It gets a bit awkward.
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 [personal profile] shiori_makiba has posted a brilliant entry in the series Love Is For Children.  "Tunnel Vision" is written half from Nick Fury's perspective and half from Phil Coulson's perspective.  It's a heartbreaking look at what's gone wrong with a great relationship.

I also found this useful for two new warnings which I have added to my repertoire on AO3: "Consider Your Headspace" and "Heed Trigger Warnings."  Those are handy for intense material.  Given how this story's opening line is such a punch in the face, they are apt.
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 [personal profile] shiori_makiba has opened her "Thank Muse It's Friday" session with a theme of "It's all fun and games."  This one doesn't run on donations, but prompts, feedback, and signal boosts are all welcome.
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 [personal profile] shiori_makiba has posted the poem "Aftermath" which is Tsubasa's perspective of what happens immediately after the kidnapping.  It runs largely concurrent with "After Shocks."
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[personal profile] dialecticdreamer posted the story "Misty Morning, Pocket Full of Stones" as part of the Berettaflies storyline.  It actually goes back farther, though, because Easy City has had a human trafficking problem for a while and that's what this is about.
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[personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted the story "Float Like a Leaf, Sting Like a Berettafly" in which Wayne encounters more trouble during his protest.  It is a sequel to "Synchronicity."  <3 T-American sociodynamics.
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I found this article about city shapes and just ... had to laugh.  "Only" is a dangerous word.  

Off the top of my head, I can think of at least three other city shapes: hexagonal, radial, and vertical.  

Now hexagonal was never common, so I'm not surprised they didn't include it.  It's super efficient for space but not very convenient for traffic, and humans figured that out fairly fast.  But I did find a hexagonal example on a search.  

Radial is a spiderweb, with straight crosslines and straight or curved perimeter lines around a focal point.  You see it in cities butted against an edge like a lake or mountain, or cities that grow up around a central point like a castle.  Here's a nice one with concentric circles, and a bigger one done all in straight lines.  This huge one is a bit more gridlike, but you can still follow the pattern of radial and perimeter lines.

Vertical cities go up the side of a mountain or cliff, such as pueblos.  Sometimes they have a vertical grid if they are built, other times a more organic pattern if they are stuffed into whatever holes people can find already there.  This cliff city basically has a front (the air) and a back (the cliff) and its access ways are mostly stairs and ladders  instead of streets.  This mountain city seems to have a central access for boats  and most of the rest is tall buildings jammed right next to each other.  Once again the prevailing direction is up/down and the primary transit is probably stairs, as it looks older and poorer than the kind of city that puts an elevator in every building.

And of course, not everyone cares about efficiency.  Here's one based on circles with houses in wedges, which totally do not pack well.  This one uses ovals around each house.  Very retro, that's what got people trying hexes and later square grids.  But if you want  that green space in between housing clusters, suddenly these models make a lot more sense.

Another division is between manmade and organic.  Grids are manmade, using straight lines and regular patterns.  Organic shapes are more random and curvilinear, like some subdivisions, and rarely work as well.  (See Stupid Street Design and Stupid Lot Shapes.)  In the article, the grids are over-represented in their set of four, and curvilinear shapes -- which do exist -- only somewhat.

Then there's the question of navigation.  Modern cities are pretty much built to be easily navigated. They want people to get in and out and around them easily.  This was not always so.  Once upon a time, cities were sometimes built for defense so that the streets were either a completely chaotic maze, or later on, deliberately designed to slow progress from the rim to the center.  It's how you discouraged invaders.  You got a similar effect if people just built stuff wherever they felt like it and/or followed natural features such as rivers.  Then the Romans popularized the grid.  Rome!  By firelight!  <3  You could charge an army right down those streets on a straight run.  For centuries, in fact, barbarian hordes had great fun doing that.  Here's a fascinating comparison of which cities have a regular grid and which are tangled.

Come on, math dudes, get your heads out of your cultural bias.
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[personal profile] alatefeline has posted the poem "Lightbulb" in response to my prompt.  This is a delightful look at different forms of perception.
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The April 2016 [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam is now open on Dreamwidth and on LiveJournal.  Our theme this month is "Ideas."  Come give us prompts, or claim some for your own inspiration!


What I Have Written

"Mindweeds" is today's freebie about the immortality of ideas.

A "shapeshifter" bingo square inspired the free-verse poem "Dark Ideas." Hilla and Randie listen to women in the chronic pain support group.
225 lines, Buy It Now = $112.50

From a DW prompt I got the poem "The Fluidity of Inspiration," which is written in unrhymed couplets. It's about liquids and solids, ideas and people.
10 lines, Buy It Now = $5  HOLD

This contributed to the free-verse poem "Maa Yea."    When a woman takes up the cause of protecting children, she ceases to be mortal.
128 lines, Buy It Now = $64

This inspired the free-verse poem "A Confession of Pain." Alicia and Judd visit the Easy City police station to share their past experiences regarding the Spectrum.
372 lines, Buy It Now = $186


From My Prompts

"Lightbulb" by [personal profile] alatefeline explores different forms of perception.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's a post about poetry in comics.

As it happens, I've done this before. A friend of mine illustrated one of my poems for a comic anthology. That was a lot of fun.

I also studied comics a lot when I was working on some relevant projects, so I learned a great deal about how they work and how to make the words for one.

With that in mind, some answers to questions from the post:

Is the artwork an illustration of the words, or an equivalent to a line of verse or a stanza?

Typically, the artwork is an illustration, as the text of a comic is usually written before the art.  

If the poet removed the artwork, would the poem be incomplete?

Usually not if the poem was written first.  

It is possible for a comic to emphasize the words, or the art, but usually it's a balance.  So if a poem were written intending to turn it into a comic, with half the weight of information carried by the art, then it might very well be clearly incomplete with only the text.

Would the illustrations make sense without the words?

A good comic usually does make sense without the words, even if much nuance is lost.  Consider the popularity of manga even if they are not translated.

Can pictures rhyme?

Rhyme is just repetition, so yes, pictures can rhyme.  Look for consistent, repeating motifs.  This could be done with any of the basic aspects of art -- shape, color, composition, character, and so forth.  I think a good visual rhyme scheme could be made with the landscape line rising and falling.
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 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted the story "Hidden Storms" based on my prompt.  Bil and his alien friends discuss etiquette, taboos, reading and writing.  <3  This is what science fiction should be.
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Magpie Monday by [personal profile] dialecticdreamer is now open with a theme of "ghost stories and echoes."  Leave prompts, get ficlets!  There are individual and collective perks.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an article on language loss through social deprivation.  Consider the extreme hostility that immigrants often face when trying to function in a new country.  The overwhelming demand that they give up their native language and culture is hard enough for people who choose  to immigrate.  For refugees, who are not voluntary immigrants, this additional violation of self can be shattering.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 [personal profile] aldersprig has written the story "Thanks" based on a slave pretending to love her master, but actually hating him.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 [personal profile] dialecticdreamer has posted the next part of the Gingerblast ad, as part of the promotion for the Magpie Monday activity on April 11.  You can still leave prompts for that.

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