ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem came from the October 7, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] corvi. It also fills the "vandals" square in my 9-11-14 card for the Halloween Bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Some languages connect to others through translation.  English is by the far the strongest in this regard.  Russian, French, Spanish, German, and Chinese also make good hubs.  That gives these languages more global influence.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Sung and played, it's very pretty.

According to my farmemory, this is a credible rendition of the court/temple style, you know, classical stuff.  The popular music was, um ... earthier.  Louder, faster, ooga-chaka stuff.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
I was thrilled to find this post about holiday carols in Native American languages.  

"Jingle Bells" in Woodland Cree has the lyrics written out as well as the singing.  "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" in Ojibwe has no lyrics, but a lovely photo collection of native creche scenes.  "Little Drummer Boy" in Navajo has the lyrics written out, and you should look at them closely -- it's not a colloquial version, but a linguistic version, and it shows some of the differences between the languages.  This sounds to me like a really great translation because it captures the Navajo culture; for instance "beautifully" instead of "I play my best" evokes the Blessingway Ceremony.  "Amazing Grace" in Cherokee just has random graphics.  "Silent Night" in Arapaho has the artist's album cover throughout.  

Of course, I am most fascinated by the ones with lyrics included.  The more information a recording contains, the more useful it is for learning, using, and transmitting a heritage language.  If I had made these, I would've wanted to include both native and English lines for comparison -- but that's my linguist instinct talking.  I can see why people would want to have just the native lyrics, and that is fine.

If you play any of these to the end, look and you'll find more links to other native language videos.
ysabetwordsmith: Jump gate showing diamond ring of light (blueshift)
This poem came out of the December 2, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] siliconshaman and LJ user Kelkyag. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles. This poem belongs to The Blueshift Troupers project.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This is a gorgeous piece of activist animation, complete with Haida language and culture, reminding people to protect the waters so that our descendants can live.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 ... apparently stays there even if the language is discontinued.

I think the weirdest effect I've gotten is that the Spanish in my brain kept growing  after I stopped studying it.  I can parse things now that I know we never studied in class.
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem came out of the August 5, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from LJ user Rhodielady_47. It also fills "the mind's eye" square of my 7-30-14 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo  fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] chanter_greenie, Anthony and Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Polychrome Heroics series.

Note: This poem is written in dialect using references for Grenadian Creole English.  The unfamiliar grammar, spelling, and vocabulary are not mistakes but rather follow rules different than those of mainland American English.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Steven Pinker is a favorite linguist of mine, and here's a piece about his views on grammar. Link courtesy of my partner Doug.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)

This poem was written outside the prompt calls, inspired by discussion with [personal profile] dialecticdreamer about her character Aidan.  It also fills the "Wild Card: Daily Rituals" square in my 6-1-14 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest.  It has been selected in an audience poll for the general fund.  This poem belongs to the series Polychrome Heroics.

The following is a morning/evening prayer that Aidan uses, from his childhood, which is thousands of years ago.  It's bilingual in a version of Proto-Indo-European and English.  The cool thing about PIE is that it's primarily a set of word bones with a few grammatical guesses.  So if you want to extrapolate what a historic tribe might have been speaking, you can pick and choose among the variables until you get something you like.  Several linguists have done this for our world; listen to an example here.  (I can actually parse words out of that.)  Here's one for Terramagne.
 

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 ... piloting a BattleMech.  This is a brilliant metaphor that will make sense to many gamers.  Remember that once the systems have overheated, it takes time  to cool down to a functional level again.  This is useful if you or someone you know has PTSD or any related condition.
ysabetwordsmith: Paranormal detective Brenda in a wheelchair (PIE)
In context of the upcoming P.I.E. fishbowl, a comment raised the issue of vocabulary in terms of disabled vs. handicapped.

For my mobility-impaired or otherwise challenged friends in the United States (where Brenda lives), what are your thoughts on this matter?  Are "disabled/disability" and "handicapped/handicap" synonyms or not?  If not, what's the difference you perceive?  Is one more limiting or more pejorative?  Are there other terms you use?  What has shaped your perceptions of ability vocabulary?  What do you think Brenda would say?  Do you find her vocabulary in the previous poems jarring or not?
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Jahai language includes a spectrum of smells.  Why?  Smells are important when you forage to survive.  You don't want to bring home something with "a bloody smell that attracts tigers."  They have a word for that.

Of course, I'm still wolf enough to think with what nose I have in this body, which is far enough above human-average that I can actually taste with it, so I've absorbed a lot of the perfumer vocabulary and can pretty well classify smells into categories like earthy, woody, resinous, smoky, floral, medicinal, musky, etc.
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem came out of the August 5, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl and is the second freebie for Twitter user Harriet Clough as a new prompter. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] chanter_greenie. It also fill the "je ne regrette rien" square in my 7-30-14 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. This poem belongs to the series Polychrome Heroics.

Read more... )

ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's a mostly tongue-in-cheek post about describing fair skin in some of the ways that dark skin is often described.

I have actually used "marzipan" as a skin tone. Also cream, peach, toast, porcelain, bisque, alabaster, grub (as in insect, not food), and uncooked bread dough. (Some of the descriptions were from a less-than-positive perspective.) Also in the white-people range are the pinkish-fair tones that are not copper, so things like ruddy, flushed, coral, and rosy apply.

Kay in Schrodinger's Heroes is Hispanic, but has fair skin, which I have described as vanilla latte: a dark cream or the palest possible brown.

Then there was the time I spent over an hour hunting around for synonyms and metaphors of "brown" that were based on things NOT associated with the slave trade, preferably things relating to African culture. Kola nut was a favorite. Ebony, which is dark brown to black, is a sacred wood in Africa and thus legit.

My desertfolk often have two or three colortones combined: rose-gold, rose-mocha, toasted-peaches-and-cream.  It's very rare to see truly pale skin or very dark skin in the Whispering Sands, but they cover an enormous range in between with subtle and complex variations of ruddy, shadowy, and tawny hues.  Very beautiful.  Oh, and to them "melon" is specifically the color of ladyparts and they make jokes about it.

ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem came out of the August 5, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl.  It was inspired and sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] laffingkat.  It also fills the "WILD CARD: linguistics" square in my Wordsmith Bingo card.

Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
I continue to be impressed with the Cherokee tradition of linguistic eptitude.  It's one of the few native languages to devise its own writing system, and now it comes in Braille too
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem is, in essence, an elegy inspired by an article, "The Story of One Whale Who Tried to Bridge the Linguistic Divide Between Animals and Humans," and therefore posted for free. It also fills the "Stockholm syndrome" square in my 6-10-14 card for the [community profile] hc_bingo fest. It belongs to the Aquariana thread in the Polychrome Heroics series.

The name "Noc" is pronounced "NOH-see."

WARNING: This poem features many intense topics, some of which actually happened in our world. The warnings contain spoilers; highlight to read. These include human/cetacean challenges, past enslavement of a sapient cetacean from childhood to death, Stockholm syndrome, survivor guilt, rough telepathic contact, grudging response to apology, and other issues. Viewer discretion is strongly advised. Please consider your tastes and headspace before deciding whether to dive in.

Read more... )

Zabernism

Jul. 17th, 2014 03:20 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Useful to know there is a word for this:

zabernism -- misuse of military authority; bullying

Profile

ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
ysabetwordsmith

December 2014

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21222324252627
28293031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags