ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem came from the December 3, 2013 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from LJ user Fayanora. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] gingicat. This poem belongs to the series Glimpses of Minoa, which you can find via the Serial Poetry page.

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ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem is spillover from the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] thnidu and [personal profile] chanter_greenie. It also fills the "humble pi(e)" square of my 3-2-15 card for the Pi(e) Bingo Fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] dialecticdreamer. It belongs to the series Polychrome Heroics.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Widely known as the model for Rosie the Riveter, Mary Doyle Keefe has passed away.  Well, I guess the Pearly Gates will be kept in good repair.  This cultural icon helped women break into the working world.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This is spillover from the April 7, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] mama_kestrel. It also fills the "phobias" square on my 3-16-15 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. Based on an audience poll, it has been sponsored by the general fund.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here, courtesy of the Open University, is a sample of Shakespeare in the original pronunciation with detailed attention to puns and other features that work in the original but not in the contemporary. 

Education wants to be free.  :D  I have to admit, I'm not a big fan of Shakespeare but I'd be more inclined to listen like this.  I had a couple of teachers who were and they were worth listening just because they had so much fun with it -- including things like this, reading the original language and pointing out subtleties.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem is spillover from the February 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [community profile] trope_bingo fest. This poem was selected in an audience poll as the free epic for the April 7, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It belongs to The Time Towers series, which you can find via the Serial Poetry page.

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ysabetwordsmith: (Fly Free)
This is the second freebie for this session, courtesy of new prompter [personal profile] moongoddessgirl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] lynnoconnacht. It also fills the "winners and losers" square in my 3-16-15 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem came out of the April 7, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] zeeth_kyrah and LJ user The_vulture. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles. This poem belongs to the series Beneath the Family Tree, which you can find via the Serial Poetry page.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem came out of the April 7, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] rix_scaedu. It also fills the "spring" square in my 9-1-14 card for the [community profile] ladiesbingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles. It belongs to The Time Towers series, which you can find via the Serial Poetry page.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an interesting computer game called Flight to Freedom, based on the Underground Railroad. Things I see as positive: a black protagonist, a female protagonist, and a plot about something more constructive than killing or looting.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 [personal profile] cmcmck is a true historian, noting the value of ephemera in history.  See some beautiful photos of graffiti about Charlie Hebdo.  This is raw cultural material.  It's not elite.  It's not meant to last.  It's a snapshot of the human soul in one moment of emotion.  Like a breath of mist on a cold winter day, it is there and gone in an instant.

Unless someone catches it.  This is what historians are for.  We are timebinders.  We see, so that humanity may know.  We witness, so that humanity may remember.

Every tidbit of information is important, although some are more famous or influential than others.  Watch.  Listen.  Record.  For what is considered important today is not always the same as what will be valued or studied tomorrow.  It is ours to keep, so that others who come after us may explore more of our time than we have left of those before us.  Because we know these things matters.

This is what we're here for.

And Je suis Charlie?  It doesn't mean we're all at equal  risk of being murdered for our beliefs right now.  It acknowledges that today they're coming for someone else, but tomorrow they could come for us, if we don't stand up and stop them.  Je suis Charlie,  unless we make a world in which it's not okay to murder people for annoying you.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Here's an article about (mostly problematic) representations of Native Americans in speculative fiction. Well, yeah, that's what you get if you read only or mostly wasicu history books. If you grow up on Naya Nuki and Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee ...

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
... has been found, well-preserved, and scientists are hopeful for DNA.
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem came out of the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] stardreamer, [personal profile] mdlbear, [personal profile] rix_scaedu, and Shirley Barrette. It also fills the "loss of home / shelter" square in my 11-25-14 card for the [community profile] hc_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Dr. Infanta thread of the Polychrome Heroics series and happens concurrently with the events of the story "Atomic" by [personal profile] siliconshaman.

WARNING: This poem contains extreme imagery that many people would find disturbing. The warnings are spoilers and also creepy themselves. The first half of the poem concerns World War II and is frankly horror. It features one of the worst things Dr. Infanta has survived: losing all her Guardians when the Nazis tested a Sterbenfeld device that killed every living thing within its radius. So that's basically extremely ill-advised experimentation in mad science, weapons of mass destruction, mass casualties, child death, child resurrection, child abandonment, loss of home, minor despoiling of corpses, and emotional trauma. All hurt/no comfort in this part. The second half concerns contemporary time, and although it's not made explicit in the poem, the reason Dr. Infanta just grabbed all her people and bunkered down is because some whackjob serial killer is running around with a nuclear-powered weapon. Dr. Infanta very quickly heard about this, assessed the situation, decided that Ilyana Cherenkov is much better suited to handled it, and then helped by staying out of the way herself. But of course it still had repercussions because the kid has PTSD out the wazoo, hence the nightmares/intrusive memories, difficulty feeling safe even in one of the best bunkers on the planet, traumatic grief, clinginess, and other unpleasantness. However, she now has plenty of people to cuddle and reassure her, so this part is h/C.  WARN ALL THE THINGS!  Please consider your headspace and tastes carefully before deciding whether this is something you want to read.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem came out of the March 3, 2015 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] brushwolf. It also fills the "warning signs" square in my 12-17-13 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette.

WARNING: This poem takes place during World War II and features assorted atrocities. If these are touchy issues for you, think carefully before deciding whether you want to read further.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 Article comes with a recording of music played on a replica.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
I first found this article, about the translation of Amazon names, which annoyingly gave only the English versions. Digging further, I came to one with more details about the process. Finally I found one with a few examples: These ancient Circassian names include Pkpupes, “worthy of armor”; Kepes, “hot flanks/eager sex”; Barkida, “princess”; and Khasa, “one who heads a council.”

Then I hit the jackpot with this lengthy discussion of how the translations come together, and a lot more examples, including more about Hot Flanks:
ΚΕΠΕΣ Kepes
Kepes appears to mean “Hot Flanks” or some other lower body part in Circassian. (Note that the name for the state of California originated from Latin for an Amazon queen Califa, cali-forn- hot-copulation). The form would be (West) Circassian
(WC) /kJepe-s/ flank-hot, with /-s/ “hot” often the second element of names even today, where it means literally “hot,” but metaphorically “intense, enthusiastic.” So, “Enthusiastic Sex.” The two stops in WC are voiceless unaspirated, just as kappa and pi were in ancient Greek
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ysabetwordsmith: (Fiorenza)
The Poetry Fishbowl is now CLOSED.  Thank you for your time and attention.

Starting now, the bonus Poetry Fishbowl is open!  This is the perk for the February 3, 2015 fishbowl meeting the $250 goal.  Today's theme is  "Fiorenza the Wisewoman."  I will be checking this page periodically throughout the day. When people make suggestions, I'll pick some and weave them together into a poem ... and then another ... and so on. I'm hoping to get a lot of ideas and a lot of poems.


What Is a Poetry Fishbowl?

Writing is usually considered a solitary pursuit. One exception to this is a fascinating exercise called a "fishbowl." This has various forms, but all of them basically involve some kind of writing in public, usually with interaction between author and audience. A famous example is Harlan Ellison's series of "stories under glass" in which he sits in a bookstore window and writes a new story based on an idea that someone gives him. Writing classes sometimes include a version where students watch each other write, often with students calling out suggestions which are chalked up on the blackboard for those writing to use as inspiration.

In this online version of a Poetry Fishbowl, I begin by setting a theme; today's theme is "Fiorenza the Wisewoman."  I invite people to suggest characters, settings, and other things relating to that theme. Then I use those prompts as inspiration for writing poems.


Cyberfunded Creativity

I'm practicing cyberfunded creativity. If you enjoy what I'm doing and want to see more of it, please feed the Bard. The following options are currently available:

1) Sponsor the Fishbowl -- Here is a PayPal button for donations. There is no specific requirement, but $1 is the minimum recommended size for PayPal transactions since they take a cut from every one. You can also donate via check or money order sent by postal mail. If you make a donation and tell me about it, I promise to use one of your prompts. Anonymous donations are perfectly welcome, just won't get that perk. General donations will be tallied, and at the end of the fishbowl I’ll post a list of eligible poems based on the total funding; then the audience can vote on which they want to see posted.

2) Buy It Now! -- Gakked from various e-auction sites, this feature allows you to sponsor a specific poem. If you don't want to wait for some editor to buy and publish my poem so you can read it, well, now you don't have to. Sponsoring a poem means that I will immediately post it on my blog for everyone to see, with the name of the sponsor (or another dedicate) if you wish; plus you get a nonexclusive publication right, so you can post it on your own blog or elsewhere as long as you keep the credits intact. You'll need to tell me the title of the poem you want to sponsor. I'm basing the prices on length, and they're comparable to what I typically make selling poetry to magazines (semi-pro rates according to Duotrope's Digest).

0-10 lines: $5
11-25 lines: $10
26-40 lines: $15
41-60 lines: $20
Poems over 60 lines, or with very intricate structure, fall into custom pricing.

3) Commission a scrapbook page. I can render a chosen poem in hardcopy format, on colorful paper, using archival materials for background and any embellishments. This will be suitable for framing or for adding to a scrapbook. Commission details are here.  See latest photos of sample scrapbooked poems: "Sample Scrapbooked Poems 1-24-11"

4) Spread the word. Echo or link to this post on your LiveJournal, other blog, Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, Digg, StumbleUpon, or any other social network.  Useful Twitter hashtags include #poetryfishbowl and #promptcall.  Encourage people to come here and participate in the fishbowl.  If you have room for it, including your own prompt will give your readers an idea of what the prompts should look like; ideally, update later to include the thumbnail of the poem I write, and a link to the poem if it gets published.  If there is at least one new prompter or donor, I will post an extra freebie poem.


Additional Notes

1) I customarily post replies to prompt posts telling people which of their prompts I'm using, with a brief description of the resulting poem(s). If you want to know what's available, watch for those "thumbnails."

2) You don't have to pay me to see a poem based on a prompt that you gave me. I try to send copies of poems to people, mostly using the LJ message function.  (Anonymous prompters will miss this perk unless you give me your eddress.)  These are for-your-eyes-only, though, not for sharing.

3) Sponsors of the Poetry Fishbowl in general, or of specific poems, will gain access to an extra post in appreciation of their generosity.  While you're on the Donors list, you can view all of the custom-locked posts in that category.  Click the "donors" tag to read the archive of those.  I've also posted a list of other donor perks there.  I customarily leave donor names on the list for two months, so you'll get to see the perk-post from this month and next.

4) After the Poetry Fishbowl concludes, I will post a list of unsold poems and their prices, to make it easier for folks to see what they might want to sponsor.


Feed the Fish!
Now's your chance to participate in the creative process by posting ideas for me to write about. Today's theme is  "Fiorenza the Wisewoman."  The primary focus is romance, in honor of Valentine's Day, so think of Fiorenza/Giacinto, Bettina/Arrigo, etc. I'll also be soliciting ideas for villagers, visitors, fairy tale characters or creatures, rural Italy, historic cottages or gardens, sacred or historic places near Fermo, ordinary objects with mystical effects, fairy tale plot twists, personal conflicts or challenges, side scenes from previous events, gaps in the storyline that need to be filled, everyday issues transmuted into rustic fantasy versions, and Italian poetic forms in particular.  But anything is welcome, really. If you manage to recommend a form that I don't recognize, I will probably pounce on it and ask you for its rules. I do have the first edition of Lewis Turco's The New Book of Forms which covers most common and many obscure forms.

I'll post at least one of the fishbowl poems here so you-all can enjoy it. (Remember, you get an extra freebie poem if someone new posts a prompt or makes a donation.) The rest of the poems will go into my archive for magazine submission.

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