ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
This poem is, in essence, an elegy inspired by an article, "The Story of One Whale Who Tried to Bridge the Linguistic Divide Between Animals and Humans," and therefore posted for free. It also fills the "Stockholm syndrome" square in my 6-10-14 card for the [community profile] hc_bingo fest. It belongs to the Aquariana thread in the Polychrome Heroics series.

The name "Noc" is pronounced "NOH-see."

WARNING: This poem features many intense topics, some of which actually happened in our world. The warnings contain spoilers; highlight to read. These include human/cetacean challenges, past enslavement of a sapient cetacean from childhood to death, Stockholm syndrome, survivor guilt, rough telepathic contact, grudging response to apology, and other issues. Viewer discretion is strongly advised. Please consider your tastes and headspace before deciding whether to dive in.

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It turns out that people arrived in the Amazon basin before it was a rainforest.  Well that's new. 
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[personal profile] dialecticdreamer tipped me to this fascinating article about Naia, the oldest paleoamerican skeleton found. 
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 See what's left of "The Centaurs," a piece of animation history.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 This project features one of my favorite parts of history, Custer's Fight at the Greasy Grass, aka Battle of the Little Bighorn.  Kickstarter is funding an original graphic novel.  The fundraiser is almost at goal and almost over, so jump quick if you're interested.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem is from the June 3, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] brushwolf. It also fills the "terrible" square on my 6-1-14 card for the [community profile] genprompt_bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. You can read more about the Kwakwaka'wakw people online.


"As Usually Happens"


When Cook's men arrived on the shores
of what they would call Vancouver Island,

the Kwakwaka'wakw people
were reverent, peaceful,
and more than a little scared
because they thought the newcomers
were ancestors returned from the dead.

What else could explain
deathly-pale people eating bowls
of what looked like maggots
and traveling in a huge black canoe
bigger than any canoe ever built,
bigger than any tree could create?

Onto the quiet shore there came
pale walkers bearing shiny sticks,
knives sharper than any flint,
words that babbled like a winter blizzard --

and as usually happens when
the undead make first contact with humans,

terrible things commenced.

ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
Treating PTSD is very difficult.  Modern mainstream medicine doesn't have a great track record with it.  But it's not a modern problem; it's been around forever.  So I was thrilled to find this article about treating PTSD with myth, poetry, and personal exploration.  PTSD is not just an injury of the mind, but also of the spirit.  So to fix it, you need things that address the spirit.  Myth and poetry are designed to do that.  Yaaayyy, progress!  

Bonus, these programs are addressed to modern mainstream veterans.  Previously the only similar thing I knew about was that Native American shamans had some great results with their traditional methods, but they tend not to share those with wasicu veterans unless somebody has a tribal contact.

Other stories about characters with PTSD can help too.  You have to find one the person can resonate with.  Tolkien's work is particularly popular because it does such a good job of describing the problems Bilbo and Frodo have after bearing the Ring of Doom, contrasted with Sam, Merry, and Pippin who come home more whole and are able to recover.  I mean you could sit with the books and a symptom checklist and diagnose poor Frodo, he is that fried.  Sometimes it's just nice to know you're not alone.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] raze is hosting a prompt call for fictional veterans. Pick a character, leave a prompt, get a ficlet.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (schrodinger's heroes)
This poem came out of the May 6, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl.  It was inspired by prompts from [livejournal.com profile] technoshaman and [livejournal.com profile] siliconshaman.  It also fills the "time travel" square in my 1-2-14 card for the Trope Bingo fest.  This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette.  It belongs to the Schrodinger's Heroes project.

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This poem came out of the May 6, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired and sponsored by Anthony Barrette. Read more about Richard Feynman.


"Room at the Bottom"


Richard Feynman
pioneered quantum mechanics,
developed the Feynman diagrams, and
introduced the concept of nanotechnology.

He participated in
the invention of the atomic bomb,
including the Bethe-Feynman formula
for calculating the yield of a fission bomb.

He was fascinated by
the nature of tiny things,
the way that a pyramid
is always wider at the base,
observing that there is
plenty of room at the bottom.

He never cared
what other people thought,
and he was often joking
whether or not
anyone else got it.

Despite their mother's disapproval,
Richard encouraged his sister Joan
to study astrophysics,
and eventually she specialized
in studying the Earth's interactions
with the solar wind.

The greatest scientists
are not jealous of their position,
but eager to share it.


ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 My partner Doug tipped me to this article about a settlement near Stonehenge that demonstrates the area was occupied permanently rather than temporarily.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem is from the May 6, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] chanter_greenie. It also fills the "women being powerful" slot on my Wordsmith Bingo card. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)

This poem is from the May 6, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl.  It was inspired and sponsored by Shirley Barrette.  It also fills the "telescope" square in my 3-30-14 card for the Cottoncandy Bingo fest.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
This poem is from the May 6, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] alexseanchai and [personal profile] janetmiles. It also fills the "traditions" slot in my 3-6-14 card for the [community profile] origfic_bingo fest. It has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
 Read an awesome piece of meta describing the evolution of the Alpha/Beta/Omega trope.  This is why we need fanworks -- because sometimes when people experiment with a canon, they create something completely new  and then use it for social commentary.
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)

This poem has been selected in an audience poll as the free epic for the March 4, 2014 fishbowl reaching the $200 goal.  It came out of the January 2014 Creative Jam.  It was inspired by prompts from [livejournal.com profile] wyld_dandelyon and [livejournal.com profile] sylvaine.  It also fills the "snowed in" square in my 1-2-14 card for the Trope Bingo fest.  This poem belongs to the series Beneath the Family Tree, which you can explore via the Serial Poetry page.

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ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)

This poem came out of the March 4, 2014 Poetry Fishbowl.  It was inspired and sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] janetmiles.  It also fills the "distance" square in my 2-1-14 card for the Cottoncandy Bingo fest.


Here There Be ...


The world was younger then,
still soft around the edges,
ink not yet dry on history's parchment.

Of the mysterious distance,
the maps said, Here there be dragons,
and it was thought to be a warning

but in truth they were guardians,
protecting the unformed world
until its boundaries grew in

and they were no longer needed.

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